Look who is swimming out of the tote, it’s Tove!

Look who is swimming out of the tote, it’s Tove!

(Source: jennwitte)

Tags: tove love

nyrbclassics:

The Pushcart War had a profound impact on me; when I was a kid I devoured it several times, and I’ve carried it deep inside me ever since. The book gave me a point of entrance—my first, I imagine—into the world of resistance to political and economic injustice and chicanery. It made opposition, even non-violent civil disobedience, seem fun and right and necessary and heroic, and something even someone as powerless as a kid could and should undertake.

—Tony Kushner

The New York Review Children’s Collection 50th Anniversary edition of Jean Merrill’s classic The Pushcart War,  illustrated by Ronni Solbert, hits bookstore shelves this week! 

jennwitte:

14. How and when do you shop for books about how and when you shop for clothes? 

We make it so easy here at Skylight Books, Saturday event with Sheila Heti, Leanne Shapton, and Heidi Julavits.

jennwitte:

14. How and when do you shop for books about how and when you shop for clothes? 

We make it so easy here at Skylight Books, Saturday event with Sheila Heti, Leanne Shapton, and Heidi Julavits.

ronregejr:

*WOW* If you have read (or even just heard about) my comic DIANA ~ *PLEASE* read this New Yorker article! It explains everything that I try to express in my short intro to the comic.

I drew DIANA as an exercise, as a re-interpretation of Marston’s original comics by someone being aware of the secrets of his personal life, and the ideas that inspired the invention of the character. This article reveals that Diana’s roots are much closer to the foundation of utopian feminism, free love, and the parthenogenic mother goddess of antiquity than I had even imagined. It also reveals that the secrets of the Marston family’s private lives were kept in the closet to a much more intense degree than I had realized.

I drew DIANA to promote the idea of approaching & imagining this character in a new way, as a gesture of thanks to Charles, Elizabeth and Olive’s original intensions. A half century of artists have imagined Diana, without really knowing all these things ~ but suspicions have been proven true. Diana is a utopian feminist icon of the highest degree. Her creation is directly linked to the women who first fought for feminist ideas, and sexual freedom in modern society.

In my experiment with giving the the story a modern reading, I actually discovered that Diana’s behavior reads like the stereotype of an entitled middle class American. From the moment that her mother molds her, she wants the moon. She will stop at nothing to have things EXACTLY as she wants them, no matter what the price. No matter what Mom says, no matter how mom & grandma had to suffer in chains, Diana will stop at nothing, and will use every magical gadget that can be created to achieve her perfect freedom. It seemed kind of amazing, yet also fitting to me, that Marston’s vision of a liberated feminist would also reflect aspects of a sort spoiled postwar America that didn’t quite exist yet.

By a strange twist of fate, the specific absence of Wonder Woman’s presence from the modern stream of superhero blockbusters shines a light on the elephant in the room of pop culture. The Bechdel test. Feminism. The inherent patriarchy of modern society is still too strong to produce a popular film with a strong feminist message. It still can’t be done. Diana is the utopian superhero of the suffragists, of freedom, of love, and of the goddess. It’s time to treat her that way.

"Marston put it this way: “the only hope for civilization is the greater freedom, development and equality of women in all fields of human activity.” ~ “Frankly, Wonder Woman is psychological propaganda for the new type of woman who should, I believe, rule the world."

lareviewofbooks:

If you live in Los Angeles, you may or may not recognize the locations in these paintings.

Art from our main page today. "100 Not So Famous Views of L.A." by Barbara A. Thomason

According to the artist, “This series of paintings began in late 2007 and was completed in early 2011.  There are actually 107 paintings.

The mid-nineteenth century Japanese Ukiyo-e artist Hiroshige’s  “One Hundred Famous Views of Edo” inspired this body of work.  The compositions I choose incorporated the vertical oban format, roughly 14”x 9” and the technique of bokashi or color gradations that are hallmarks of Ukiyo-e woodcuts.

I executed these works in cel vinyl paint because it resembles woodblock ink in texture and tone.  The paintings are not of well-known views of Los Angeles but are more intimate and quirky.  The pieces are informed by the color, compositions and tonal changes of Hiroshige’s works.

My objective was to pay homage to both Los Angeles and Hiroshige’s wonderful prints. “

For more, go here.

SPECIAL HOURS AND SPECIAL EVENT THIS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2014
We will be opening at 12 Noon on Saturday, September 20 and closing at 8:00 p.m. so the many of the staff can attend the wedding of one of our beloved Skylight Books booksellers! 
 
We will also have a special event at 5:00 p.m.:
 
SHEILA HETI, HEIDI JULAVITS, and 
LEANNE SHAPTON present their book 
WOMEN IN CLOTHES!


Skylight Books is thrilled to present three phenomenal writers — Sheila Heti (How Should a Person Be?), Heidi Julavits (The Vanishers), and Leanne Shapton (Important Artifacts) — for a discussion of their highly anticipated new book, Women in Clothes.
This event will feature a clothing swap!  Attendees are encouraged to bring one special item of clothing that you’d like to swap, with your name and an interesting detail about the garment pinned to the piece. Men are welcome to participate in the swap, too. You don’t have to bring an item to attend, but we encourage it. All leftover clothing will be donated.
This is a free event but you will need to buy a book if you want to get it signed (more information here).
SPECIAL HOURS AND SPECIAL EVENT THIS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2014
We will be opening at 12 Noon on Saturday, September 20 and closing at 8:00 p.m. so the many of the staff can attend the wedding of one of our beloved Skylight Books booksellers! 
 
We will also have a special event at 5:00 p.m.:
 

Skylight Books is thrilled to present three phenomenal writers — Sheila Heti (How Should a Person Be?), Heidi Julavits (The Vanishers), and Leanne Shapton (Important Artifacts) — for a discussion of their highly anticipated new book, Women in Clothes.

This event will feature a clothing swap!  Attendees are encouraged to bring one special item of clothing that you’d like to swap, with your name and an interesting detail about the garment pinned to the piece. Men are welcome to participate in the swap, too. You don’t have to bring an item to attend, but we encourage it. All leftover clothing will be donated.

This is a free event but you will need to buy a book if you want to get it signed (more information here).

jcgabel:

Today’s post is dedicated to Carson McCullers’s brilliant first novel, The Heart is a Lonely Hunter, which was published to great acclaim almost 75 years ago when the author was just 23. This novel is for anyone who has ever felt like an outsider or reject. I recently re-read the 1940 classic, and have collected various editions and incarnations of the book, most of my adult life. Here’s a sampling.  

(Source: jennwitte)